How to Prevent Mint From Spreading and Taking Over

Peppermint, spearmint, lemon mint (lemon balm), chocolate mint, horse mint, catmint and similar kinds of mint are easy to grow and are very good aromatic additions to the garden or flowerbeds. They do have a drawback, however. Mints tend to be invasive. If steps aren’t taken to prevent it from happening, mint can take over the flowerbed orĀ garden. These plants can be grown in pots, however there is also a way to keep it from spreading out and taking over when it is planted outside. Perhaps no mint is better known for its propensity to spread than peppermint. However, all members of the mint family will spread if the conditions are right. Some species, such as sage, thyme, basil and anise sage spread primarily by seeding themselves. To keep these from spreading, simply remove the blossoms before the seeds have a chance to form. Peppermint, spearmint, lemon mint, catmint and others spread primarily in a different way, however. We’ll use peppermint as a representative example. Mint rhizomes As a peppermint plant grows, it begins to put out underground rhizomes. These roots are usually one to three inches deep and run generally parallel to the surface. They can also grow over two feet in length. From the rhizome, new plants can emerge periodically and once they break the surface, they become self-sufficient plants, which can in turn produce more rhizomes. Many people with lawns are aware of this principle because this is exactly how crab-grass spreads. The rhizomes are actually a Continue Reading →


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