Category: Inspiration

Inspiration Friday – Using Crochet to Re-Fashion Your Clothing for



It’s Friday. The end of the week. The day most people look forward to all week long…
Oh, technically it’s Saturday, but I began writing this post on Friday. It’s now past midnight, so we will just pretend it’s still Friday or else I’ll have to change it from “Inspiration Friday” to “Inspiration Saturday,” and it just doesn’t have the same ring to it.

Anyways, Friday is the perfect day for a little inspiration and easy-going fun, am I right? That’s why I am bringing you some gorgeous fabric + crochet ideas to play with this weekend!

Take a look at some of the inspirational photos I’ve been drooling over lately, and don’t forget to share your own in the comments!

Crochet Back Shirt
[Source: the top pictured above is one that used to be sold on Etsy, but is no longer available, according to the site, so the source is unclear.] However, it’s a perfect example of how the result of combining crochet with fabric can be stunning.

shirt
[Source: Anthropologie]

Crochet Tejidos [Source: Crochet Tejidos]

043ae94532ae6cfc0fc201dd96119dfa [Source: Ekaterina Kukhareva: Spring Summer 2012. Crochet and Fabric.]
I absolutely love the look of neons with neutrals like the tan and neon green in this dress. I’ve been seeing this color combo in shops for the last year and I’ve noticed crochet and knitting showing up in fashion more and more lately. In fact, last winter, I saw a similar color combination as this dress in a knitted sweater at a local shop and was thrilled! Finally, us yarn-crafters can put our neon colors to use without it being so tacky. Lol. 😉 I usually add some gray with my neon yarns. It helps keep it more modern nd less ’70’s.

Shirt with crochet back by ShopPinkMagnolia [Source: ShopPinkMagnolia]
Oh. My. Gosh. This top with a gorgeous lacy detail straight down the back is absolutely drool-worthy. If I can get my hands on some crochet threat again… This will be what I attempt next. Looks more like an Irish Lace design, and that is not something I’ve been able to learn yet, but plan to.

The correct use of those beautiful, intricately detailed crochet doilies:
Heart crochet inspiration
[Image source: Oma Koppa]

Makes you wonder why they weren’t invented for this very reason from the start, right?
I crocheted a medium sized, simple flower-like “doily” in white, baby yarn last winter and sewed it onto the back of a charcoal gray long-sleeved shirt that wasn’t fitted. I had kept the shirt around because it was comfortable, but I’d wanted to make some alterations to it so that it wouldn’t look so much like a sloppy, little boys shirt. The fit was old-school and so it looked like I was wearing a shirt from the little boys department at Target. Not flattering. Believe me.

So I ended up turning it into a crop-top (subtle crop! Not a belly shirt, promise.) and then sewed a band on the bottom (using the material left over from cropping the bottom), crocheted my flower-slash-modern-day-doily and sewed that sucker onto the back.

I actually planned on going for a cut-out style in the shape of the doily, and then sewing the doily down, but to play it safe, I sewed the crochet work onto the shirt first and was going to cut the fabric out from underneath the crochet doily. It would basically leave bare back showing from underneath the crocheted doily, which I thought would be so adorable. However, when I tried the top on after sewing, I liked it so much as it was that I couldn’t decide whether I wanted to leave it as it was or go ahead and cut the fabric. I ended up leaving it, but might change it in the future.

Unfortunately, we’re still in the warm season, so I don’t have a photo of my re-vamped top since my winter-y clothes are all packed up and stored away still. Just maybe I can convince myself to dig it out and get a quick picture sometime soon.

To satisfy your curiosity though, I went and found few pictures of shirts done in a similar way as the one I made:
Crochet Doily On Back of Shirt DIY by diyfamilyti.me [Source: diyfamilyti.me/]

Don’t you love it?
From the first time I tried on my doily-backed top, I could hardly resist the urge to crochet more and slap them on all of my tops! I have managed to keep those urges under control so far, but I fear that it won’t be long until I break down and doily-up more of my t-shirts!

Crocheting onto your regular, everyday fabric clothing really does provide so many possibilities. Just looking at the yokes and necklines of simple tank tops (like the first photo on this post) makes my crochet-addicted fingers want to go to work on making one of my own. I love the way it transforms a regular old, plain top into something fun and stylish, yet versatile. It can take your wardrobe options to a whole new level. Just imagine one of those overly-casual, loose-fitting tops in your closet transformed by a little crochet doily (or a brand new neckline made of funky stitches) — now you can throw on your favorite jeans, feel comfy and cozy in your t-shirt, but with the newly added crochet detail, it looks totally glamorous!

We could even take it one step further by adding a statement necklace and some heels (ok, flats. Who wears heels nowadays when you can find bling-y sandals or flats equally as glamorous, right?).

Told ya this was versatile! Plus, if you already know how to crochet, making a simple doily to sew onto one of your shirts can be done in such a short amount of time you’ll be able to wear your masterpiece the same day.

Last but not least, here’s an adorable way to change up a plain t-shirt by adding simple crochet detailing to the sleeve:

Source: Choies.com
Source: Choies.com

Want more crochet & knitting inspiration like this? Then follow Crochet As You Are on Pinterest!



Guide to Mesh Crochet + Ideas for Using Mesh in Your Projects

What is Crochet Mesh?
Crochet mesh typically describes a type of stitching that creates an “open” appearance and is airy in nature. It’s sometimes referred to as netting. Mesh crochet is a super easy way to make quick, airy, lightweight garments that are especially suitable for summer time!

In this post, I’ll be sharing the different types of mesh stitches, a few garments that incorporate mesh stitching into their design, and tutorials on how to complete different mesh stitches.

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20 Awesome (Free) Easter Crafts to Crochet 2015

Easter is coming up, and as promised, I’ve scoured all available resources and compiled a beautiful list of 10 free Easter crochet patterns for all of you who are filled with spring inspiration and have your hooks ready for all things Easter. Are you as excited about the upcoming warm weather and bright colors as I am?

1. Free Easter Bunny Crochet Basket Free Pattern Lion Brand
Oh my bunny-goodness! This crocheted amigurumi Easter bunny basket is beyond adorable. Just look at those perfectly floppy ears.

And the pattern, from Lion Brand, is not only beginner-friendly, but free too!

Some kid is going to have one very special basket to collect his/her Easter eggs in this Easter!

2. Jam Made free Crochet Easter Basket number 2
If it isn’t a colorful, floppy-eared bunny basket that would make you grab your hook n’ yarn, then perhaps this totally “awww!-worthy” basket, complete with a precious bow will.
The free pattern/tutorial is available from Jam Made.

3. crochet-butterfly-square
If you’ve got spring fever, then this granny square with a butterfly crocheted on top might be the perfect spring project for you. Imagine an afghan full of these brightly colored critters.

The free pattern, by Luana Gay Stoker is available on FaveCrafts.
I think a grey square background with multi-colored butterflies would be lovely.

4. Whiskers and Wool free crochet Easter egg pattern

These pastel colored Easter egg coasters are fun for Easter time, if you are a coaster-user. If you aren’t, these are almost enough to make you want to start using them!

The free pattern is available by Whiskers and Wool here. I love this blog!

5. Whiskers and wool Free bunny crochet pattern
These itsy bitsy adorable little bunnies really bring on the Peeps cravings!
Free pattern for these cuties, which are another Whiskers & Wool design. I told you that blog was fabulous!

They look like quick little fellas to crochet at the last minute, and could make fun gifts or Easter egg hunt surprises.

Note: The pattern is a download, so when you click this link and arrive at the Whiskers & Wool blog, be sure to click the “download” link, which you’ll find directly below the image as a caption.

6. Lady Crochet Free Easter egg Crochet Pattern
Forget those ol’ plastic Easter eggs and toss in a few of these bright, gorgeous crocheted ones for a change of pace!
https://ladycrochet.blogspot.com/2011_03_01_archive.html
The pattern — offered for free by the lovely Inge at Lady Crochet — is a bit addictive, as the Lady Crochet warns. Once you finish making one egg, you may not be able to stop.

But that’s okay. Crochet away.

7. Free Crochet Chick Pattern by Drops Design Garn Studio

Crochet a bazillion little chicks to go along with the bazillion little eggs you just finished.

An easy-to-follow pattern is available on Garn Studio, for free by Drops Design and can be accessed here.

Note: This little fella does require some stuffing.

8. LucyRavenscar free chick crochet pattern
This is another little chick, although he is miniature (only 1.5′ tall!) but I think he is much cuter than the one above.

There’s a free pattern available at LucyRavenscar, so follow along if you’d like to create this cutie.

Just imagine a basket full (perhaps a *crocheted* basket full) of an assortment of different colored mini chicks! I’m thinking one in every pastel color — purple, blue, yellow, a light green, etc.

I always did believe the saying “good things come in small packages.”

9. Free Crochet Amigurumi Bunny Egg Cozy Lion Brand
Crochet this easy, precious, fluffy-tailed mini Easter bunny egg cozy using Lion Brand’s free pattern.

Remember, good things come in small packages?

The cutest egg cozy ever! Just slide an egg inside and hide. This cutie will make a very fun Easter egg hunt!

That’s this bunny – a good thing in a small package. I think I know a few adults and kids who’d both love an itty bitty bunny like this fella.

10. Free Crochet Bunny hat and Diaper pattern by sarah repeat crafter me

What Easter crochet frenzy wouldn’t be complete without such an adorable little bunny-eared hat?

Right?

But, try the hat and matching (too adorable!) diaper cover, too, and then send your many thanks to Sarah at Repeat Crafter Me for such an outstanding and free pattern because your little one is totally gonna rock this cute outfit!

Well, I hope these lovely free Easter crochet patterns have you as inspired as they have me, and if you’re like me, your hands are itching to be holdin’ a hook and strand of yarn right now! Spring is coming up (I know we still have quite a while) and boy do those ideas start going wild. I wonder if I’m the only knitter/crocheter who starts getting project crazy when a new season is coming up? I start thinking of all the new projects and garments I can begin making for the new season. Yet I typically don’t even get to complete half of them! Lol.

Do you guys do that too?

Oh, and tell me, what will you be crocheting or knitting this Easter?

Huge Craft Giveaway At FaveCrafts

Giveaway by FaveCrafts
Image source: FaveCrafts

FaveCrafts is like the ultimate online hangout for crafters. I’ve been quite the diligent subscriber to them due to their continous free patterns they offer for knitters and crocheters. Not to mention their array of projects and ideas for every other craft on the planet.

While I spend a lot of time browsing the FaveCrafts website, I don’t often enter the giveaways they feature. Mostly because I’ve never won anything in my life, and usually don’t have time to really get into entering any giveaways.

However, FaveCrafts feature some really amazing giveaways, and sometimes when I have spare time on my hands, I find it impossible to pass up entering. Particularly, the huge craft supply giveaway they have running right now.

The Ultimate Craft-tastic Grand Prize Giveaway includes craft products from the following brands: Fairfield, SpinRite, Clover, Sizzix, Little B, Simplicity, I Love to Create, DOW Chemical, Plaid, Cousin, FloraCraft, and Stencil1. Talk about a giveaway worth entering!

Head on over to FaveCrafts right now to enter the giveaway yourself, then you can come back to finish reading this post, if you want to.

The deadline is February 28, 2015, but you can enter the giveaway once every single day up until the deadline!

You can also earn extra entries by sharing the giveaway on your social media sites, as well as an extra entry by featuring the giveaway on your blog, like I’m doing right now. 😉

If you’re a subscriber of FaveCrafts newsletter, you’ll be notified of their bi-weekly giveaways via e-mail, so you can enter the giveaways as soon as they go live. I subscribe and get their newsletter to check out their free patterns and craft ideas every week, and that is how I knew of the giveaway that’s going on right now. For some reason, this time, I felt compelled to enter this one, and perhaps I’ll manage to find time to continue entering their giveaways from now on. Just the thought of winning a craft supply giveaway as ginormous as this one is enough to get my heart rate up a little!

Winning this kind of giveaway would really have any crafter all set for all kinds of new crafting adventures!

To see a list of all the giveaways running by FaveCrafts right now, you can click here and go through to find the giveaways you want to enter, if you would like to enter more than the one giveaway.

Being a lover of crochet, knitting, beading, and many other crafts, I basically stalk FaveCrafts everywhere online. I find a lot of awesome, free patterns and inspiration from their Twitter posts as well, so if you’re like me and want more, you can follow them there, too.

Now that my entries are all in, I’m going to take a crochet break myself. I’m working on yet another garment at the moment. I’ve only gotten as far as the chains so far! But will be starting the first actual row any minute now! Wish me luck. I’m really hoping this one turns out stunning.

Do you guys enter giveaways? Craft giveaways only, or do you enter all sorts of different ones? Have you ever won anything? I’d love to hear your stories! Also, if you guys know of other giveaways going on, go ahead and share those with me, too, if you like.

Oh, stay tuned for a post I’ll be doing on a shawl I’m currently knitting (yes, I’m working on two projects at once.) I’ll be uploading photos of the finished Io Shawl from Willow Yarns, and will also be doing a review sometime very soon (when I can finally finish the shawl.) The pattern has been the most frustrating, complicated knitting pattern I have yet to attempt, so it’s a slow-go, but I’m doing my best to get the beauty finished so that I can feature it here as soon as possible! I hope you’ll stay on the lookout for it.

109 Year Old Man Knits Penguin Sweaters

Almost as soon as he arrived at an aged-care village, Alfred Date was told by the nurses who knew of his ability to knit that the Phillip Island Penguin Foundation was in need of sweaters for animals.

That’s how the incredible 109 year old Alfie, who’s first attempt at knitting was a whopping 80 years ago — began his road to knitting loads of sweaters for little penguins. The following are some photos of penguins rocking hand-knit sweaters.
REX_penguins_ml_150211_16x9_992

Little penguin (Eudyptula minor) wearing a hand-knit sweater. Photo courtesy Lyn Blom of Phillip Island Nature Parks.

tog_penguin01
The Penguin Foundation makes it clear on their website that this call for sweaters is “not a fashion statement,” but that penguins can actually be killed by an oil patch the size of a thumb nail. A thumb nail! Holy smokes. I didn’t know this.

When oiled penguins are admitted to the Wildlife Clinic at Phillip Island Nature Parks, a knitted jumper is placed on the penguins to prevent them from preening and swallowing the toxic oil before they are washed and the oil removed by staff, ” a statement on their website says.

The little bird sweaters knitted by Mr. Alfred and others helped save many lives of the Phillip Island penguins. The sweaters made it possible for 96% of the birds to be returned safely back to the wild, said the foundation.

You can watch the interview with Mr. Alfred here.

What an inspiration Alfred is! Not only to knitters and other yarn-crafters, but to humanity as a whole, if you ask me. We may not all be able to donate, say, monetarily, but everyone has their own thing they can do to have an immensely positive impact on the world. It may be your handy-skills like Mr. Alfred, or it may be that you’re able to donate cash. It’s true that every one of us have something special to give, whether it’s to help our fellow humans or animals. Mr. Alfred’s story warmed my heart so much that I felt compelled to share what was a beautiful reminder to me — that we all have something to give, even those who may feel like they’re too far along in life to bother.

While the Penguin Foundation no longer has a need for sweaters, they are asking for donations with their “Adopt-A-Penguin” project where for $75+, you can adopt a penguin.

The Penguin Foundation aren’t the only ones to recognize, and fulfill wildlife’s needs by use of knitting. Take for example, the Wild Care Bay Area’s Baby Bird Nest campaign where 3,568 little bird nests were knitted to keep the baby birds warm in 2014!

Click here to see a video of these adorable little fellas enjoying their hand-knitted nests, and being bottle-fed, which is totally aww-worthy.

Knitted Baby Bird Nests for WildCareBayArea.org Campaign  Image source: https://www.wildcarebayarea.org
Knitted Baby Bird Nests for WildCareBayArea.org Campaign
Image source: https://www.wildcarebayarea.org

These folks are another example of combining human compassion with handy skills as a way to help wildlife in need. Like the Penguin Foundation, the Baby Bird Nest group also ran a successful campaign to warm up baby birds by calling for knitted beds! How beautiful is that?

While the Baby Bird groups is no longer in need of bird nests, although their website says they do plan to start the campaign for more nests this year — they still have the free instructions for knitting the nests available on their website, if anyone is interested in knitting a basket for their own pets, or those of your friends. Just be sure to make them bigger since a cat is typically much larger than a baby bird. One of the most common requests I get, as a knitter and crocheter is pet beds, as shocking as that is. Even I am surprised to get the request so often.

I think the little nests the birds are snuggling up inside are so adorable, and quite a genius idea! I’d have never thought of this, and I can see these also being an idea to incorporate for other in-need animals as well. I can only imagine the love a cat would have for one of these cute baskets!

I also happen to know that during the cold winter months, homeless animals like cats need shelter, and a lot of animal-groups put calls out around winter time asking folks to provide shelter methods for homeless cats, if they can. I recall seeing one lady’s beautiful, hard work in this exact area last winter. Perhaps this is something we can add to our arsenal of tools to help warm our fellow furry friends.

She had made it her mission to put together little cat homes for homeless cats in her area. She used those large plastic tubs you can get at Walmart or any dollar store for around $5-$10, filling them with warm materials, including those silver “things” made to be placed in the windshield of cars (to help hold in heat to keep kitties warm). Leaving the lid on the tubs, she placed them around areas she knew to be common for homeless cats.

The effort, love, compassion and work that goes into doing something like this for animals (and our fellow humans as well) has such a lasting impact on my heart. It really inspires me, and I hope that it will inspire you too, and warm your heart to no end.

What are some ways you (or stories you know of) have donated your handy-skills or time and effort to help animals and/or humans in need? Please share in the comments. I absolutely love hearing uplifting stories like these.

Crochet in Fashion — Outdated or Here to Stay?

Don’t underestimate crochet’s widespread effect and adoration. Virtually everybody and their mama have owned or do own a piece of crocheted work whether it’s an afghan or a sweater.

While crochet and knitting and most all yarn crafts do have somewhat of a “grandma” reputation, I feel like the crafts aren’t always given the credit they’re due, and I’m pretty sure my fellow crafters would agree. I mean, you spend 6 months working on a small throw or a sweater. Knitting and crochet both require a serious amount of time and work, and not to mention all the brain work that goes into it.

But this is not a rant about the time and effort that goes into creating something with two sticks (or one hook), your hands and a tangled ball of yarn. I’m not here to convince everyone to dig out their old, itchy sweaters handmade by grandma (or the memories of said itchy, old sweaters) and start wearing them again with a newfound, but itchy appreciation. If you can’t appreciate a hand knitted or crocheted item, then that’s totally fine! I think sometimes us yarn crafters tend to expect everyone to be able to love and value our craft, but the truth is, some people simply don’t dig it, and that’s okay.

I am one of those folks who don’t have an eye for art. I look at a painted canvas and my mind starts slowing down. I still appreciate the time and effort that the artist put into their work, but I am not likely to want to hang it on my wall or wear it just because. So really, the same applies to me and my yarn works. I have to remember that not everybody has an “eye” for what I create, and I can be okay with that. I just have to remember it.

That aside, what I actually wanted to discuss is that crochet and knitting might be under-credited crafts when it comes to the reputation it gets. People always think granny when you mention knitting or crochet, but if you look around, the crafts are so amazingly timeless!

Knitted and crocheted items have literally seeped into every corner of the world, every culture and even most categories of shopping. In fact, the granny square is alive and well, even at the start of 2015, the granny square is still being seen in the form of garments and afghans.

In fact, just today (January 2, 2015), I flipped open W Magazine — which is being sent to me unsolicited despite my pleading with the senders to stop wasting paper and resources to send me magazines I never even want or read — and there was a red-headed woman dressed in a funky printed dress with a red, black, and white granny square tank top snugly over it. (MiuMiu)

On the right, the exact photograph I described from W Magazine — Designer Miu Miu.

So these timeless crafts are still as big as ever in our world, and here most of us yarn-crafters were thinking we were some of the only folks left on the planet who ran around with needles, hooks and a ball of yarn in our hand (or for some of us, purse).
Another example of crochet in high fashion. Image source: Helenrodel.com.br

Crochet and knitting shows up on the runway more often than chiffon. The holiday season always brings new fair aisle sweaters in a brand new color combinations to greet our eyes as many designers crank out new designs and patterns.
Another Helen Rodel example. Source: https://www.helenrodel.com.br/news/2014/11/29/helen-rdel-in-shanghai

Even Dolce & Gabbana are well-known for their crocheted pieces, although I can’t honestly say I’m a fan of D&G, and that definitely includes this grandma-tacky bag! And we wonder why crochet gets such a granny-esque air about it?

Yves Saint Laurent in crochet + mini pup = Epic!

Let’s face it, as far as knitting and crochet, those crafts are here to stay!

The finished Child’s Cardigan!

Well, I finally finished the last sleeve on the little cardigan I have been working on crocheting for my 5 year old niece. Now that I’ve had the time to weave in all those irritating yarn ends, I was able to make time for a few photographs of the finished product, too!

I did end up adding some ruffle touches to the sleeves. I am a sucker for ruffles, so it wasn’t easy to contain myself and leave it to the sleeves and front edges only. Otherwise, the entire thing would be nothing but frills! Believe me, it wasn’t easy not to do that.
Bug's Cardi. 2

Bug's Cardi. 3

Bug's Cardi

Bug's Cardi 4

Bug's Cardi 5

Bug's Cardi 6
I feel like this was a pretty rewarding project, but will be even more so when I get to witness my niece actually wearing it, and liking it.

I’m definitely glad that I decided to go ahead and use the Caron One pound of yarn, although it surprised me that this cardigan actually took up the entire pound almost! A tiny little cardigan! I thought for sure I’d have about half the yarn roll left over. I like the rose-color and figured the gray and white made for the perfect color combo, as it always does. But the reason I’m happy with the pink Caron yarn is because I didn’t realize how snugly soft this stuff was compared to other acrylic yarns like Red Heart until I actually began using this soft stuff. Compared to the other popular acrylic yarns on the market, this stuff is perfectly soft, and others are terribly scratchy, which I hate.

I want to make note that not all Red Heart yarn is scratchy. In fat, the Made With Love is some of my favorite, soft-wise. It’s bouncy and soft, and fluffy, but you don’t get much in those rolls, so I try to get it on sale when I’m using it.

Unfortunately, during my rushing around today, I left my flat iron on near the cardigan and apparently, part of the straighteners plate was touching the cardigan. The result:

Here you can see where my hair straightener had touched the cardigan. Odd that it turned yellow, but I am just glad it didn't damage the yarn itself!
Here you can see where my hair straightener had touched the cardigan. Odd that it turned yellow, but I am just glad it didn’t damage the yarn itself!

Back and mistake

Imagine how horrified I was to have just finished this sweater only to realize that as I was getting ready and doing my hair today, I mus have sat the flat iron a bit too close to the cardigan and it burned the yarn… yellow! How odd! It’s almost as if it striped the pink dye from it, and the original yarn color was this ugly yellow color! I kicked myself all day for doing this, but have thought up a couple solutions, although not perfect ones. 1. a technique where you simply cover the posts/stitches that are damaged and mis-matched in color with thread of matching color (pink.) By simply wrapping some thread, or the matching yarn around the stitches that are damaged, and tying off in the back, it should cover it. Thread will do the trick without creating a thicker (which extra yarn will create) spot where the mistake was.

Solution number 2: Simply turn the cardi inside out. Since it’s virtually identical on both sides, this could work. The only problem I have with using this easy out is that the decorative bubble stitching around the neck is more noticeable on the original “right side out” and by having to turn it inside out to hide the mistake from my flat iron, those pretty stitches won’t have the same “sticking-out” appearance. 🙁
Bug's Cardi 9

Bug's Cardi 10

Bug's Cardi 11
Still, I believe the only option other than a total re-do, which is out, is to turn it inside out where the ugly mistake is on the inside, not the out.

What about you guys? What are some of the last-minute fixes you’ve had to wing? Any ideas on a way to fix mine?

Free Crochet Amigurumi Octopus Patterns

I’ve added a brand new project to my to-do stash and am actually quite proud of myself for completing it in a somewhat timely manner. This is the octopus I finished just in time for Christmas, and finally had the chance to share him with you guys.

As a matter of fact, he was featured here on Crochet As You Are in one of the recent posts. I thought he was so cute I had to hurry up and make one myself. He is available on Joann as a free pattern, but in order to complete him in a timely manner, that required some tweaking to the size for my own octopus. I also tweaked mine to only use two colors instead of the multiple colors the pattern actually calls for.

I went for simple, so you don’t necessarily have to follow the exact same amount of color changes the pattern calls for. I do recommend using contrasting colors for the eyes, though or else it might look odd. 😉

Another thing that should be mentioned is that the original pattern contains mistakes, so if any of my lovely, fellow crocheters want to create an octopus of your own, I recommend heading over to Gleeful Things where Julie has kindly laid out her own notes for you so that you can avoid the mistakes you’ll run into if you only follow the original pattern. So, bookmark her page or print out the instructions she gives and then begin the octopus from the original pattern. You’ll be glad you did, unless you don’t mind the mistakes, and ending up with a 4-legged octopus! Technically it’s an 8-legged octopus, but if you go the route I did with him, you’ll end up with what appears to be only 4 legs, split at the very ends.

Take a look at the photos to see what I mean. I chose to sew my octopus’ legs all the way to the near bottom that way he ends up with more curl to his legs and it kind of distracts from the fact that he has 4-legs total (8 technically, but not if you sew the entirety of each leg up from top to bottom.)

All this leg talk probably will not make sense to you until you’ve taken a close look at the photos and the pattern for this octopus.

Overall, though, this really wasn’t too complicated to complete. The instructions can be a tad confusing, but most crocheters will probably be able to follow. I just wish I’d have caught the printed mistakes before I started crocheting! I still think he turned out okay since I’m no perfectionist, but if you are one, the legs will probably be a real bother to you until you get them just right, so don’t take any chances and be sure you follow Julie’s instructions for getting past the mistakes.

I just love her color combo for the giant octopus she created!

While on this octopus kick, I came across severely really cool patterns for different octopus, and later wished I’d have chosen one that did not contain mistakes. I thought I’d share my octopus results with you here and also include patterns for a couple of different ones available online for free! Yay for the kind folks willing to give their awesome free patterns, right?

Below, I’ve listed a couple of the free patterns for octopus that I’ve found and think are mighty cute, so you can choose from more than just the one pattern here.

1.Free Octopus Pattern by Paula Gail

I think the one by Paula Gail is stunning, and appears to be a bit more simple than the one I went with. I’ve actually been hoping to get this one going sometimes on, too! What a interesting yarn color she chose.

2. Mini Octopus by Sarah from Esshaych

These perfectly miniature octopus are much smaller than the first one pictured in this post, but equally adorable octopus are probably going to be a great option if you want to crochet an octopus in a short amount of time.

Aren’t they adorable? I know I can’t seem to resist them, and will more than likely be crocheting one or more myself! I am counting down for the moment I can start on one.

And lastly, here’s one more mini version Baby Octopus Amigurumi Pattern by Amanda at Adorably Kawaii

So, which of these adorable little fellas will you be crocheting? Please do share your project pics with me, too!

Lion Brand “Curtain Call” Cardigan WIP

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I’m back to my knitting project tonight! It’s one of those less-than-lovely days for me and knitting always soothes me and puts me in a grand mood, so I decided to pick it up for a few minutes before getting up and actually doing something that needs to be done tonight.
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I didn’t forget that I promised to update as I go while I’m knitting the free Curtain Call Cardigan by Lion Brand, so here are some photos. I had to rip out my work and start all over on this project more times than I care to share, especially considering this is practically the easiest cardigan ever to knit. I kept messing up my rows and couldn’t remember if I’d purled or knitted (and forgot how to tell the difference by looking at the stitches, but now I am well educated in that department.)

I’m not nearly as far into this cardigan as I’d hoped to be by now, but that’s because I had to put the needles down to hurry and finish up a few other projects, one being the little cardigan I crocheted for my niece… Those sleeves? Still not finished! I’m also working on a whole ‘nother crochet project — an octopus amigurumi — for my nephews right now and am hoping to be able to crank two of the suckers out before Christmas. It’s been such a slow process lately!

I’ve mentioned in previous WIP (which stands for “works in progress” in the knit and crochet world) posts that I have been knitting and crocheting like mad, and that I even take my projects with me outside the house so that my significant other can drive and I can try to get as many stitches in as possible! Lol. Trying to get things done before Christmas so that I can actually have them done in time to give them to the recipients. Yet I’m also spending every second possible working so that I can keep up with the insane expenses that comes around this time of year, so it’s quite hectic in my neck of the woods. I’m actually to the point of losing sleep now. If it’s not because I’m working over time for extra cash, it’s to get caught up on my crochet projects, so at the moment, I’m borderline deliriously exhausted. Ha. Ha.

More on the knit cardi, though. I wanted to include a tip:
As much as I hate to point out such a blatant flaw in my design, this is a good opportunity for my fellow crochet and knitters to be reminded of the importance of having enough balls of the same exact yarn with the same exact dye-lot. Now, scroll back up and it’ll jump out and hit you — where my first roll of gray yarn ran out, you can see a significant change in the grays used! I actually knitted and crocheted with this exact same yarn (both skeins rolled into one ball) forever and never noticed the shades were two different colors! My love bucket just had to notice and point it out one day as I was knitting. It still took me staring at the project for minute after minute before my eyes caught the change in colors! So, take this as your warning or reminder to always try and match your yarn. In this case, I went back to the store and picked up a brand new roll from the exact same brand and even the same yarn name (“heather gray”) and yet I still came out with two totally different grays! Lol. Who knew gray could vary so much.

I figure once Christmas comes to an end, I’ll get back to work on this cardigan and will definitely update with my progress pictures as I go! So far, I’m just going to leave this how it is instead of ripping out my work and trying to find a perfect match to the gray. In the long run, it’s just going to take away a lot of time (and some $) that I simply don’t have to spare. Time is everything right now! 😉

Oh, one more thing! Did ya’ll notice the adorable owl cup? My mom gave me that as a gift the other day, so I couldn’t help but show it off in my pictures as I was photographing the knitting project I’m working on. I love this cup! I really can’t resist a cute owl, and this isn’t the only own cup I own. My love got me an adorable one last year, so now I have one more to add to that collection. Cute, huh? My mom found it at Marshalls.

Thanks for all of you who have been visiting me and staying updated with my craziness and progress. I truly appreciate each of you who come by and love all of your comments!

Has anyone else worked the Curtain Call Cardi? Or Do any of you plan to try this pattern? I really like it and think it could look amazing in so many different colors and yarn types. I also love that it’s versatile and I can see that it’ll be super easy to tweak the pattern to add something original into it. I might just go for more than one of these since it’s so easy, and in that case, I’ll definitely tweak things a bit to add something else to the plain cardi.

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