Well, I finally finished the last sleeve on the little cardigan I have been working on crocheting for my 5 year old niece. Now that I’ve had the time to weave in all those irritating yarn ends, I was able to make time for a few photographs of the finished product, too!

I did end up adding some ruffle touches to the sleeves. I am a sucker for ruffles, so it wasn’t easy to contain myself and leave it to the sleeves and front edges only. Otherwise, the entire thing would be nothing but frills! Believe me, it wasn’t easy not to do that.
Bug's Cardi. 2

Bug's Cardi. 3

Bug's Cardi

Bug's Cardi 4

Bug's Cardi 5

Bug's Cardi 6
I feel like this was a pretty rewarding project, but will be even more so when I get to witness my niece actually wearing it, and liking it.

I’m definitely glad that I decided to go ahead and use the Caron One pound of yarn, although it surprised me that this cardigan actually took up the entire pound almost! A tiny little cardigan! I thought for sure I’d have about half the yarn roll left over. I like the rose-color and figured the gray and white made for the perfect color combo, as it always does. But the reason I’m happy with the pink Caron yarn is because I didn’t realize how snugly soft this stuff was compared to other acrylic yarns like Red Heart until I actually began using this soft stuff. Compared to the other popular acrylic yarns on the market, this stuff is perfectly soft, and others are terribly scratchy, which I hate.

I want to make note that not all Red Heart yarn is scratchy. In fat, the Made With Love is some of my favorite, soft-wise. It’s bouncy and soft, and fluffy, but you don’t get much in those rolls, so I try to get it on sale when I’m using it.

Unfortunately, during my rushing around today, I left my flat iron on near the cardigan and apparently, part of the straighteners plate was touching the cardigan. The result:

Here you can see where my hair straightener had touched the cardigan. Odd that it turned yellow, but I am just glad it didn't damage the yarn itself!
Here you can see where my hair straightener had touched the cardigan. Odd that it turned yellow, but I am just glad it didn’t damage the yarn itself!

Back and mistake

Imagine how horrified I was to have just finished this sweater only to realize that as I was getting ready and doing my hair today, I mus have sat the flat iron a bit too close to the cardigan and it burned the yarn… yellow! How odd! It’s almost as if it striped the pink dye from it, and the original yarn color was this ugly yellow color! I kicked myself all day for doing this, but have thought up a couple solutions, although not perfect ones. 1. a technique where you simply cover the posts/stitches that are damaged and mis-matched in color with thread of matching color (pink.) By simply wrapping some thread, or the matching yarn around the stitches that are damaged, and tying off in the back, it should cover it. Thread will do the trick without creating a thicker (which extra yarn will create) spot where the mistake was.

Solution number 2: Simply turn the cardi inside out. Since it’s virtually identical on both sides, this could work. The only problem I have with using this easy out is that the decorative bubble stitching around the neck is more noticeable on the original “right side out” and by having to turn it inside out to hide the mistake from my flat iron, those pretty stitches won’t have the same “sticking-out” appearance. 🙁
Bug's Cardi 9

Bug's Cardi 10

Bug's Cardi 11
Still, I believe the only option other than a total re-do, which is out, is to turn it inside out where the ugly mistake is on the inside, not the out.

What about you guys? What are some of the last-minute fixes you’ve had to wing? Any ideas on a way to fix mine?



2 Comments on The finished Child’s Cardigan!

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