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Ad Blockers : For or Against? Like ‘Em or Not, They’re Here!

Ad Blockers : For or Against? Like ‘Em or Not, They’re Here!


“Facebook has long been one of the big reasons people use ad blockers, …”

♦ Klosowski, Thorin. “Facebook Now Blocks Ad Blockers.” Lifehacker. Gizmodo Media Group, 09 Aug. 2016. Web. 21 Jan. 2017. (http://lifehacker.com/facebook-now-blocks-ad-blockers-1785033813).

From my point of view, I get why the Ad Blocker came about. People felt almost like they were being stalked. But if you ask my opinion, I think people were / are being or reacting unreasonably.

Companies or vendors have always done research to try to target the right market or audience or group in order to sell their products. It’s the reason we used to receive so much junk mail in our mailbox. Vendors didn’t know who to mail their ads to, so they just mailed them out to everybody! 🙂  Mailing was / is a significant business expense. It’s even more significant if you mail stuff and 95 % of it goes into a trash can without even being looked at.

Here’s the thing. When we watch or watched TV, don’t or didn’t we just get up and take a bathroom break whenever commercials came on?  Why can’t people just ignore the ads?  There is no reason to interfere with legitimate business and commerce by putting up Ad Blockers.   This coming from the person who is more than happy to block a telemarketer who calls via phone, especially during dinner time.  That’s just flipping annoying!

Why do I think folks should compromise about the ads?

Most social media accounts can be created FREE. Let’s be real! Nothing in this world is free. Somebody’s paying for it! So if you are allowed to have an account and you’re not bearing the costs to maintain it, then please allow the owners of that site to earn advertising revenues.   Otherwise they may have to start charging you a fee for that social service you enjoy so much.

Just saying.

FREE or FEE? Choose!!

Furthermore … if a program can be created to install an ad blocker, another program can be created to uninstall it. Or … the site owner will just ask you nicely to turn it off.   🙂

For example, below is the first sentence in an article published by Business Insider.

“Because Business Insider is an advertising-supported website, we request that you turn off your ad blocker (AdBlock or AdBlock Plus) when accessing the Business Insider site.”

♦ Insider, Business. “How to Disable an Ad Blocker on Business Insider.” Business Insider. Business Insider INc., 08 Sept. 2016. Web. 21 Jan. 2017. (http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-disable-an-ad-blocker-on-business-insider-2016-8).

Picture it.  You’ve landed at a terrific site that you want to freely browse and peruse.

How can you not turn off the Ad Blocker when they ask you so nicely?

Just saying.  🙂

 

Ad Blockers : Like ‘Em or Not, They’re Here!

Google is reportedly developing an ad blocker for its web browser Chrome. The move could expose Google to criticism, given the fact it operates ad networks of its own.

Bummer!  🙁

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Additional References:

Allan, Patrick. “Adblock Plus Is Now Selling “Acceptable” Ads.” Lifehacker. Gizmodo Media Group, 13 Sept. 2016. Web. 21 Jan. 2017.

Hern, Alex. “From nasty to nice: how adblockers are trying to pivot.” The Guardian.  Guardian News and Media Limited, 12 April 2017. Web. 12 Apr. 2017.

 



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