Why Gamers Don’t Believe That EA’s Paid Demos Were A Mistake

EA FIFA Demo

So maybe you have or you haven’t heard about something that’s been traveling around the gaming news industry like a bad disease in a military barracks sitting next to a boondocks bordello? Well, if you haven’t, I’ll fill you in: Demos for Electronic Arts games have showed up on the Xbox One’s store page… with a price.

There’s been a lot of debate over whether or not EA’s premium demos were part of a calculated test-run for a more nefarious future for vertical slices released to the public, or if it was just a gosh-darn honest mistake. Well, there’s some pretty good reasons why a large majority of core gamers saw the news and reacted the way they did. But first, let’s get the story straight and clear before getting into the good bits.

Originally Hardcore Gamer ran a story about various demos of EA games showing up on the Xbox One’s store page with region-appropriate pricing. NeoGaffers even managed to snap some screenshots of the event just so you know that they aren’t just trolling to be trolling.

Miles Quaritch posted an image of the game showcasing how much it costs to purchase the FIFA 14 demo over in the Xbox One’s store. Check it out below.

EA FIFA Demo

Another user noted that the game demo was available for €4.99 in Germany.

Over in North America the demos for FIFA 14 and EA Sports UFC carried $4.99 price tags as well.

However, EA wanted to clear the air that they weren’t the ones pulling those strings… it wasn’t their fault!

Well, that’s what the word on the street is.

According to Polygon, EA Australia told them that it was an “error in the system”. Yep, EA probably went in to add some EA Sports UFC underwear DLC and it magically broke Microsoft’s Xbox One store prices for the demo, even setting appropriate regional pricing for Australians by setting the demo price to $6.65. Yep, that’s all just an “error”. No one could have gone in the backend and manually setup the regional pricing for the demos. Apparently Kinect misread some NSA commands and by mistake changed the prices on EA’s game demos, yeah?

Of course, the obvious question is: why wasn’t this an issue on the PlayStation Store? Well, as noted in the Polygon article…

“EA Australia told Polygon that the error isn’t on the PlayStation Network, but if it was, it’s been rectified already.”

Now there are some sites out there stating that gamers and the gaming community pulled back the hammer of criticism too quick and squeezed the trigger of judgment on EA without just cause. Some of EA’s defenders believe that the community has simply become too jaded and cynical.

Well, when EA basically tells the entire core community that they’re wrong for not wanting to be wallet-raped by in-app purchases or bank-drained by microtransactions in universally panned mobile-trash-compiled-into-digital-code called Dungeon Keeper, it’s easy to see how the community might be somewhat judgmental of a company when premium demos start showing up.

I mean, it wasn’t too long ago that we found out that swimming pools and toddlers were removed from The Sims 4. There was also an issue involving complaints regarding price-gouging in Real Racing 3, as reported by Eurogamer.

Xzibit

Is it so far fetched that a company whose previous CEO wanted to entertain the idea of charging for bullets in Battlefield that they might also want to charge for pre-release game demos? Heck, Bungie and Activision have pre-order beta tests available, essentially if you’ve paid for the game you get to play early, although in the same vein if you want to play-test the game you still have to pay to get in.

Is it so far fetched for the core audience to put on their negative-Nancy or downer-Dick caps and think “Well heck, this is a previous two-time winner of the Worst Company in America, I guess they want me to pay for demos now”?

Heck, EA is still catching flak over the sorry state in which Battlefield 4 launched; the net-code was more crooked than 17th century British teeth. And do I even need to bring up the error that kept erasing saved games?

Yeah, I think gamers reacted within a measure that matches EA’s previous track record. If this happened to be Valve or Nintendo or even Naughty Dog, I’m sure there would be a heck of a lot more leniency in this regard. But Electronic Arts? Yeah, they’re going to get a lot of hate because they’ve done a lot to the community to deserve that hate.



  • Shawn

    Gamers are quite pathetic these days dam near embarrassed to associate myself with these pieces if shit, why would they charge for a demo people act like human beings can’t make mistakes and who would be the idiot to actually pay for a demo. You wanna bitch about something go bitch about the psnow prices and it is beta now that’s pathetic, n4g is so sad and so are all the fan boys who frequent that site …

    • Billy

      lol… those tears, so delicious.

      I understand people make mistakes but how do you make the mistake of individually setting regional prices for a demo?

      If the demo cost like $99.99, I think we would all laugh it off as an error, but $4.99 actually seems like the kind of price EA would go with for a demo.

      • DarthDiggler

        Another so called “I am privy to all EA internal actions” claim. Got any more strawmen crybaby boy?

      • Billy

        Nope… they all burned down when I dropped those fact-bombs in the article.

        http://i.imgur.com/5HFiWNM.jpg

    • DarthDiggler

      I think there is a very vocal minority. PS Now beta is likely also in beta for pricing. Prices do seem high, but if the object is to create revenues they will lower the price if our perceptions are typical.

      I have PS Now and most articles have pointed out the worse case scenarios. Cherry picking isn’t a very good form of information gathering.

    • Stickz

      Do you get a bonus from EA for posting this kinda stuff? or is it just part of the regular paycheck?

      OT: I don’t hate EA, they did make some nice new IP’s which im grateful for(Dead Space, Mirrors Edge, Dantes Inferno, in some shape also Mass Effect and Dragon Age), but they just keep doing retarded shit. Releasing a new bf before fixing BF4, retarded dlc, Spore, toddlers n pools in sims 4, pressuring developers for a release date thus making the game worse and I won’t even talk about all their yearly spors games which are just 3 times normal price expansion packs. Now this bullshit, if no one would have complained u can bet ur ass that EA would keep the price on demo’s.
      EA just stahp.

      • DarthDiggler

        @Stickz

        You know I for one am just sick of what amounts to a hive minded hate against EA. This article is a shining example of that. The article is about EA’s pricing of demos on XBL, yet this author has to bring up a whole laundry list of EA’s past sins, as if that is germane to the issue at hand. This kind of writing does little to make any new arguments and does little to shine light on the current situation other than to use it to further some cliches about Electronic Arts.

        I like EA, they make a great deal of great games. I haven’t experienced any gross miss use of microtransactions or DLC from EA. I have always been happy with the value that they deliver be it on disc or downloadable content. I do not play their mobile games, but I don’t play ANY of them, because they are ALL RIPOFFs. EA isn’t doing anything that other companies aren’t doing in regards to the mobile space.

        I am not a Mass Effect fan, but I thought it was ridiculous everyone bitched about an ending. Dragon Age Origins did largely the same thing, why it dodged the gamer rage bullet is unknown. How much more entitled can you get than to start a campaign to twist the arm of a creative entity to change their creative vision post launch. People got pissed off when George Lucas did this, yet when gamers cry, piss and moan about it — sure that is fine. :-P

        I am a huge Battlefield fan and while I wasn’t happy with the net performance of BF4, EA wasn’t complacent with the issue and patches did start rolling in quite often with many improvements made over the time period. Every Battlefield game launches with issues, I just don’t want DICE to stop pushing that envelope, but in order to do so the audience needs a little patience with the process. More beta testing will help, but it’s hard to scale a beta test in a manner that resembles a launch. Launch night for a popular game is a sever killer.

  • DarthDiggler

    Gamers believe / don’t believe many things that are out of sync with reality. :)

  • Dirkster_Dude

    EA has less trust than Microsoft when this sort of thing happens. Nobody will believe them whether it was a mistake or not because at this point it is about the big company that cried wolf.

  • Alienraygun

    Five bucks, while it may be a fraction of a full game price tag, is not a microtransaction. Just sayin.

  • Billy

    You have zero evidence (or facts) at your side here

    https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2925/14389237749_37a4a45cd4_z.jpg

    You have no proof so you put the burden of proof on to someone else to disprove

    Polygon noted that there was price adjustment for the Australian demos of FIFA and EA Sports UFC… lol.

    Wild claims and speculations never = facts. Those are the antithesis to evidence.

    It’s a good thing I wrote an article with plenty of evidence and facts to back up those statements.

    Mmm… mm… this milkshake is delicious. The salt adds just a hint of flavor.

    • DarthDiggler

      @cyguration:disqus

      I mean no disrespect but you really can’t be this dense. I am not suggesting that there was no issue with “pricing” of demos on XBL. Obviously screenshots are proof.

      My issue is you assuming EA did this on purpose as noted in your words…

      If the demo cost like $99.99, I think we would all laugh it off as an error, but $4.99 actually seems like the kind of price EA would go with for a demo.

      And here…

      Yep, EA probably went in to add some EA Sports UFC underwear DLC and it magically broke Microsoft’s Xbox One store prices for the demo, even setting appropriate regional pricing for Australians by setting the demo price to $6.65. Yep, that’s all just an “error”. No one could have gone in the backend and manually setup the regional pricing for the demos. Apparently Kinect misread some NSA commands and by mistake changed the prices on EA’s game demos, yeah?

      Suggesting EA priced the demo for $5+ on purpose is just pure speculation. You attempt to guise your speculation using the burden of proof logical fallacy.

      https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/burden-of-proof

      See the fact is you are just trying to ride on Polygon’s coat tails here. You didn’t break the story, but you certainly can’t resist the chance to showcase your pure EA bias in it’s full glory so you added the angle of “gamers don’t believe EA did this on accident”.

      I’d like to point out, you did not focus group gamers. I see no attempts to poll them, so you are just pulling this information out of the air.

      There is little to no intellectual value in this writing. In order to make a claim about ANYONE it helps if you have some actual evidence about that claim. YOUR CLAIM BEING EA DID THIS ON PURPOSE. That is what you have NO EVIDENCE for. I have seen the screen shots and I have seen EA’s quote I have seen nothing that indicates EA did this on purpose.

      Now if you respond with screenshots you are only going to demonstrate how poorly you understand the English language and undermine what little shred of credibility you still have as a “writer”. I am using that term writer liberally.

      • Billy

        There’s no way to scientifically gauge the response of the community when only a certain pool of gamers were even exposed to the news and know what transpired. The only thing that can be gauged is the community response, which is what lies as the variable impetus for the article.

        Also, no where in the article does it explicitly state that EA did, in fact, commit the act. The article only infers that gamers believe that EA did the act deliberately.

        My issue is you assuming EA did this on purpose as noted in your words…

        Sorry son, you’re putting together a strawman based on what you think I stated. In order to assume, I would have had to state an accusation of sorts, in which case I did not. I only asked about the conditions of the state of EA’s potential err (one that doesn’t fall favorably on their side).

        In order to make a claim about ANYONE it helps if you have some actual evidence about that claim. YOUR CLAIM BEING EA DID THIS ON PURPOSE. That is what you have NO EVIDENCE for.

        Once again, there is no claim because a claim requires a stated clause, in which case there is none. There are, however, questions. As we know, a question is not a claim and you can’t accuse someone without making a claim.

        No where is it stated that EA did this on purpose in the article. It was an assumption you made out of haste, or possibly with a few shillings… *wink* *wink*?

        lol.. try harder, son.

      • DarthDiggler

        @cyguration:disqus

        Now to respond to the rest of your mind-numbed dribble.

        There’s no way to scientifically gauge the response of the community when only a certain pool of gamers were even exposed to the news and know what transpired.

        Polling can be very scientific if it is done properly. Admittedly it falls outside your intelligence and talents so I would understand why it may seem mysterious to you.

        The only thing that can be gauged is the community response, which is what lies as the variable impetus for the article.

        This is YOUR response, don’t call it a community response. You certainly don’t speak for me.

        Also, no where in the article does it explicitly state that EA did, in fact, commit the act. The article only infers that gamers believe that EA did the act deliberately.

        Your headline more than implies it. That is the reason people read the article.

        “Why Gamers Don’t Believe That EA’s Paid Demos Were A Mistake”

        The article that follows is the alleged proof which is ironically based
        mostly on assumption. Using the false cause argument that if EA is guilty of these sins they are guilty of this one.

        FALSE CAUSE: https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/false-cause

        Also without that polling, you can’t speak for “gamers” unless you talking anecdotally, and I didn’t see any quotes from any other “gamers”. The more accurate headline would have been …

        “Why Billy Doesn’t Believe That EA’s Paid Demos Were A Mistake”
        :)

        you’re putting together a strawman based on what you think I stated. In order to assume, I would have had to state an accusation of sorts, in which case I did not. I only asked about the conditions of the state of EA’s potential err (one that doesn’t fall favorably on their side).

        Which is exactly what you did, your article is one long theoretical “lets assume the worst”, because that dovetails with all of EA’s other evil actions. You do not hold secret your disdain for EA which is an admission of the bias that creates the very assumptions you suggest that you don’t have.

        You don’t understand the term strawman either. Given your article this is likely the first opportunity you have heard of logical fallacies.

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  • Leeroy Jenkins

    Theres one thing it could be hackers i mean it was Americas 2 times as well worst company so yeah theres that also it seems like the thing EA would do and hiding they been hacked and all